Is it a crime to bring or ship medical marijuana into Texas?

Starting in Colorado but rapidly spreading to other states, recreational marijuana legalization has drastically changed cultural attitudes about marijuana over the last decade. Widespread use of marijuana has opened more people’s eyes to its potential medical uses and lack of overdose risk, unlike alcohol.

Not that long ago, most people strongly agreed that marijuana deserved its Schedule 1 status as a very dangerous drug with no medical benefits. Now, with legalization showing very few negative impacts and CBD having become one of the most popular alternative health treatments available, more people than ever before think of marijuana as something relatively safe and even potentially medically beneficial.

However, it is still a federal offense for people to purchase marijuana products in one state and bring them into another.

People use marijuana for a variety of purposes

Some people with extreme medical conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, degenerative neurological conditions and cancer have found both pain relief and potential treatment options in marijuana. Unfortunately, Texas does not recognize the medical uses of marijuana other than seizure suppression, and the law that exists doesn’t really create a workable framework for patients who need marijuana extracts for their health.

The lack of legal access to marijuana could lead patients or their loved ones to go purchase marijuana in another state and bring it back to Texas. Regardless of why you tried to bring marijuana products into the state, you could find yourself facing federal prosecution if you get caught.

Legal marijuana isn’t that far away

Texas is bordered by multiple states with active medical marijuana programs. Additionally, for those willing to drive through Oklahoma, it is also possible to reach Colorado, where marijuana is legal for any adults to purchase and use regardless of their medical history.

While you can legally buy marijuana in other states, you cannot transport or ship those marijuana products back to Texas. Doing so is essentially interstate drug trafficking, a federal offense that could carry substantial prison time.